52 Frames: Week 19: Architecture !

We’re shooting Architecture this week. Go out to places and shoot structures that we might not pay enough attention to – the sleek glass façade of a modern skyscraper, or maybe something with an art-deco frontage from decades earlier. Architecture isn’t all about the outsides alone, there are many places with magnificent interiors from churches and temples to a modern airport lounge.

Old medieval church and new built modern Library in Kirkkonummi, Finland

The church and Fyyri library (2020) were reconciled with the help of building materials and so that the reading room and café opened towards the church. A large glass wall visually connects the church into the library.
Kirkkonummi’s medieval stone church is located in the center of Kirkkonummi. The exact time of construction is unknown, but work apparently began in the 15th century. Kirkkonummi Church is named after St. Michael the Archangel.

Originally, the Church was small. In addition to stone, brick was used as the material. In the 18th century, the church began to expand, and in the mid-19th century it was transformed into its present form as a cruciform church. The church bell tower was built in 1824.

Window detail of the library

It’s not just all about shots of buildings either – things like bridges and underpasses, tall radio masts, dams, windmills can all be amazing subjects. There’s also a lot of character in structures that are old or run-down: wabi-sabi is a concept that explores beauty in the imperfect and that ties in very well with many different kinds of structures.

old and new in color

Find an archway or opening you can use to frame a shot. Or use the architecture to create leading lines, symmetry, and repetition of shapes. Take your time, scope out your composition – maybe walk around a bit, looking for a nice perspective and shooting angles that work. A little bit of thought will make for some compelling and creative architecture images.

December 12

Trying to capture Christmas spirit at a church concert in Mikael Agricola Church. Theme still being Blue anf white

Mikael Agricola Church (Finnish: Mikael Agricolan kirkko, is a Lutheran church located in the Punavuori district of Helsinki, Finland. It was designed by Lars Sonck and built between 1933 and 1935. The church was inaugurated on 14 April 1935.

The church is made of red bricks. The tower of the church is 97 meters high, the top reaching up to 103 meters above sea level. The 30-meter spike of the tower can be retracted if necessary as it fits inside the tower structure. This was done in the Winter War and the Continuation War so that the tower wouldn’t act as a navigational aid to enemy bombers.