52 Frames: Week 27: Negative Space!!

 Less is more. This week’s Negative Space challenge is what those words are all about. Make your composition’s subject stand out by ensuring you eliminate clutter, distractions and sometimes even a background.

Peony in monochrome

Many minimalistic photography images have a great deal of negative space to isolate the subject. There are tons of genres and ideas that would make for very compelling shots – architecture, landscapes, portraits, food photography, abstracts and so much more. Think about the story or emotion you’d like to convey to your viewer and compose your shot after taking some time to think about it.

Daisy

We’re looking for clear, un-cluttered images where the space surrounding the main subject or idea enhances your shot by taking the viewer’s eye straight there. That little bit of extra space allows for breathing room and leaves no doubt as to what the main point of interest is.

Alone with bokeh

There’s magic in negative space, when used wisely, so think, breathe, shoot…

TIPS:

  • Zoom with your feet: Move around to get the best composition for your photo.
  • Different shooting angles: Because everything else is simplified in your frame, you have more license to “break” the rules of typical composition, for example where your subject is placed in the frame, or where they are looking.
  • Find your background first: Go on a hunt for a red brick wall, or a blue garage door, then place your subject in front of it.
  • Balance: Use the negative space to balance out the main subject. Don’t go overboard with the negative space, making it hard for the viewer to understand and absorb the main focus point of your shot.
  • Shoot wide open: That dreamy, creamy bokeh is a great way to simplify your subject’s background, and keep the frame more minimalistic.
Negative space with daisies

I would have loved to use some of the shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of negative space.

52 Frames: Week 26: Pattern!

For many of us, seeing a Pattern comes quite naturally – after all, it’s just something being repeated in a pleasing way. That’s why so many of our creations use patterns – whether it’s the crimped crust of a pie or some beautiful inlay mosaic work on floor tiles – patterns and repetition of shapes stands out to us.

I had lots of ideas, but well I run out of time and took an easy way out, because patterns are everywhere, but to get an interesting shot of it, is an other thing altogether. I went with the fern this time as the shot of peaches and butterfly are not new and the challenge is to take a new photo every week. If I had had the energy I could have tried to capture similar shots again. Not this time 🙂

Maple leaves

Let the patterns to tell a story and that’s where the creativity comes in. Look for geometric and sharp angular patterns if you want to compose something using a pattern of shapes. You could also seek out patterns with colors. This challenge can overlap with other sub-genres like Repetition or Textures. Other genres like Abstract Photography or Architecture are also great ideas to find patterns.

Fern leaves

One final thought – Most, if not all, patterns have repetition. But not all repetition forms a pattern. Just think about that for a bit.

Extra Challenge: Found In Nature

The wings of a butterfly

Tips and Tutorials

TIPS:

  • Shooting Angle: Consider taking your shot at an unconventional angle – the human brain perceives patterns differently when shown in different perspectives.
  • Shape Patterns: Hunt for shapes and geometrical forms that draw the eye in. Use those to direct the viewer to where you want.
  • Color Patterns: In a world of color, look for collections and bunches of distinct colors that are recognizable.
  • Go Wide: A wider field of view may help get more subtle patterns to be more noticeable.
  • Make Your Own: Using a prism or reflective surfaces can make for some amazing portraits.
  • Break The Pattern: Try and create a contrasting point of interest by breaking the pattern and having an object of focus in the midst of your composition.

Peach

Droplets

As I stated in my 52 Frames post, that I would post a separate post about droplets. Here it is.

I love photographing them, most of them are not worth the digital space they take and sometimes I am lucky and I am happy with them and share them. As you have guessed, I am happy how these turned out. Minimalist, simple and green.

“A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener.” – Henry David Thoreau

52 Frames: Week 24:  Shoot From Above!

Time to look at things from a new perspective – this week, we’re going to Shoot From Above. Most images are taken at eye level or with the camera parallel to the horizon. With a high angle shot, we’re trying to get photos from an unusual angle, taken from above the subject and looking down towards what you’re shooting. Why ? Well, the short and sweet answer is – you get some cool shots this way.

I submitted the one of the table, but I wanted to post some of the droplets I captured this morning, yes, I shot them from above, but you cannot tell that from the photos. So I did not use them. I am going to do an other post just with them, but here are some of my choices of including some flowers also, naturally 🙂 My entry was not the most unusual, or original, but due to not being able to venture outside my yard due to summer flu my choices are rather limited.

Droplets
old newspaper clippings on a table top

You can shoot some cool portraiture by getting up higher than your subject. Food and product shots are also well-suited to being shot from above (just pay attention to your lighting and shadows). Oh, and let’s not forget flat-lays – you can go minimalistic or mega creative with your ideas here.

And of course, the evergreen favorite: landscape shots – whether natural or urban. Just position yourself somewhere high (and safe) and shoot scenes of what’s happening below -. Go a bit abstract and look down the mirrored facade of an office building.

Droplets on a string of grass
Fern
  • Depth Of Field: Your DoF will help a lot here – do yo want to isolate your subject?; Go for a wider aperture like f/1.8 +. Want lots of detail in focus for that cityscape? Maybe f/8 or f/16 would be more suitable.
  • Composition: Look for lines and objects around that help create a strong composition, especially if your subject is isolated and at a distance.
  • Go High: If you can’t get to a height, try and make your camera do so – hold it up higher above your head and if you’re lucky to have a flip-out screen, that’s exactly the scenario that it’s there for! You could also mount your camera on a monopod, set a timer and hoist it up high to get a cool shot.
  • Selfie Stick: It was all the rage a few years ago, and the humble selfie stick can easily help out in this challenge.

Abstract – icy

“Abstract art is uniquely modern. It is a fundamentally romantic response to modern life – rebellious, individualistic, unconventional, sensitive, irritable.” – Robert Motherwell

“You can`t look at abstract art without thinking.” – Patricia Cole

“The longer you look at an object, the more abstract it becomes, and, ironically, the more real.” – Lucian Freud

Abstract – pink tones

“Abstract pictures are fictive models, because they make visible a reality that we can neither see nor describe, but whose existence we can postulate.” – Gerhard Richter

“Even abstract shapes must have a likeness.” – Willem de Kooning

Abstract – yellow tones

“There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.” – Pablo Picasso

52 Frames: Week 20: Abstract !

It’s time to put on your creative in hats 👩‍🎨 and take some Abstract images. Photography that makes use of patterns, textures, blur and often enough indistinct shapes – all to convey emotions or to share a narrative.

I did have fun with this one, you will unwillingly be subjected to several posts from my attempt to capture abstract, I shot around 170 frames and trying to find something different or more odd was difficult as I was drawn to certain look and tried to avoid the obvious

Think about focusing on colors and shapes, rather than concentrating on getting technical details like focus and depth of field. There’s absolutely NO right and wrong – it’s all subjective and open to what you – the photographer – wants their viewer to feel.Abstract photography is all about form, color and texture coupled with uncommon viewing angles. Get low, look at the undersides of things, go in close to grab some texture, use bubbles and liquid drops to make random patterns of light and color. Experiment and feel free to mix genres and techniques to create some absolutely amazing shots.

Look at playing around with blur, movement or something that looks different from what you’re trying to portray – yeah, that’s a tough nut to crack but if your viewer can turn to you and ask – “Wow! Great shot… what is it?” – yep, you’ve hit the brief.

feverfew

I post these feverfew shots just because they are pretty, and they kind of say spring , summer. No other than that.

May 15th, Saturday finds

As I pointed out in my previous post, it is time to pick up my camera and take it out. I did. Here are some of the captures from the first outing, still need to get in the the groove. I will try to find new ways to capture same wonders that I have photographed every spring, because the same things delight me every time.

Maple tree bud

We found the nest of common blackbird in our woodpile. I did take few photos, but we left it all alone. Hope the squirrels dot get to it before the hatch.

Moss, the evergreen

“Moss grows where nothing else can grow. It grows on bricks. It grows on tree bark and roofing slate. It grows in the Arctic Circle and in the balmiest tropics; it also grows on the fur of sloths, on the backs of snails, on decaying human bones. It is a resurrection engine. A single clump of mosses can lie dormant and dry for forty years at a stretch, and then vault back again into life with a mere soaking of water.” – Elizabeth Gilbert

Beige

Beige is dependable, conservative, and flexible. The color beige is neutral, calm, and relaxing. The attributes and meanings associated with beige change based on the colors it accompanies.

The color beige offers some of the warmth of the color brown and the some of the crisp and coolness of the color white. While it is a relaxing color, beige is often seen as a dull and boring color.

52 Frames: Week 15: Extreme Closeup!

this week I have been taking close-up shots. Time to get up close and personal with an Extreme Closeup. If you are thinking this is the MACRO challenge, it is NOT. If you go to the dictionary, you’ll find a closeup is  1. a photograph, movie, or video taken at close range and showing the subject on a large scale. “a closeup of her face” or 2. an intimate and detailed description or study.

I did the winter worn hydrangea again, as the date on the picture has to be same as the weeks challenge. I took shots of the dry flower I had in in bouquet I had couple weeks back. I also have shots of my cat Tinka, but I have to look them thought and edit.

What can you tell your viewer by pushing in close? 
What do you want to bring attention to?
Try to find an interesting detail or feature – heck, the most mundane of objects can have something striking if you look closely enough. That’s what this challenge is all about – take a moment to look closer and see those details that are often overlooked.

so simply put, move in and fill your frame with your subject.  The idea is to get right into a subject, and have that subject fill the entire frame. You can zoom in with any lens you have, and your feet also make an excellent zoom feature, just walk close to your subject! 

PS. This week like last has been hoping and praying that the snow would melt, but it is happening so SLOW!!!! The southern facing slops are free of snow, but our backyard, come on this has 0-40 cm snow. So not much to spot of the spring wonders that delights me every year…

52 Frames, Week 14: Nature! #2

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Details from nature is my other option, the ball hydrangea has weathered the winter well, and I love how the structure and texture has begun to show. I know I have taken similar shots before, on many occasions, but honestly near home there is not much that inspires me at the moment. So, any opinions as what to post as my entry for week 14 ?

Nature shots aren’t restricted to wildlife out in the middle of nowhere. Nature Photography is here to make us feel connected with our home, this pale blue dot 🌍 we call earth. Go out and capture the beauty that surrounds us all.

Macro shots of ball hydrangea after winter

52 Frames, Week 14: Nature!

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Nature shots aren’t restricted to wildlife out in the middle of nowhere. How about a starry night shot with a long shutter? Or the waves of the ocean with a high shutter speed to freeze motion?  Not possible for me, we have snow, rain an slush… still!!!

Nature Photography is here to make us feel connected with our home, this pale blue dot 🌍 we call earth. Go out and capture the beauty that surrounds us all. I took these of the hill that is just behind our backyard. Capturing weather, snow.. and the the trees on the fill.

Snowing sideways…
the wind has slightly let up…but still snowing pretty heavily

Nature in detail was my option, the ball hydrangea has weathered the winter well, and I love how the structure and texture begin to show. I know I have taken similar shots before, but honestly near home is not much that inspires me at the moment. So any opinions as what to post as my entry for week 14 ?

pine tree

Same, continues

I have not done much, so only thing I’ve really taken photos of is my flowers. They are beautiful so why not. Tinka enjoyed them too.

weekend bouquet

I found this beautiful bouquet when looking for flowers to bring to a friend I was to visit. I ended up buying two bouquets, one for me and the other to take to her. Here are some detail shot of it, it is has so many beautiful details that I just have to share the joy I get from it.

circle of roses

“The rose is a rose from the time it is a seed to the time it dies. Within it, at all times, it contains its whole potential. It seems to be constantly in the process of change: Yet at each state, at each moment, it is perfectly all right as it is.”

– Paulo Coelho

A feeling of…

I am stressed and anxious. So I really got into playing with my images making them into rounded shape, Mandala’s. My thoughts are going around, I an surrounded by emotions that do around again and again. Me, trying to escape.

Fun, fun and fun

I am stressed and anxious. So I really got into playing with my images making them into rounded shape, Mandala’s. I tried the style with flowers, my art, people, city scape’s. Here are two from a bunch of tulips. Colorful, bright, and fun. Stress relief.

flower of the day

Contrasting colors and flowers – one more shot. Slight editing difference in the feature shot and one in the post itself.

For no reason other than

it’s pretty?

I haven’t taken any photos lately, so how about just a lovely photo of a flower to brighten the day.

Color contrast