Computer issues

This summer has had some technical issues that I would not have needed. First I had the issue with back up, my hard drive was full, couldn’t store, upload my photos, so I did not edit my photos due to that issue. Summer vacation came, which was 😊 great.

Took photos as we took short trips here in Finland. I did start to edit them, but once again I was encountered with a problem. My computer would not open any of my editing programs, Lightroom for example, I was not able to open any of my folders in those hard drives I got earlier in the summer. My computer signed off. I had to buy a new one which I got 5 days ago, but as I am at the summer house and the computer arrived back home an hour after we left on come here it is now waiting at my neighbors for me to go back home to get it.

Shortly, I have done very little photography and even less editing. I have been on holiday even from blogging, but soon, sometime next week I will return.

I have eaten some nice meals 😊

52 Frames: Week 31: Choose Color!

Look around and we’ll see something we take for granted – color. Our wonderful world is filled with it, so this week we’re asking you to Choose A Color. Make that color the theme and inspiration behind your image. Colors evoke moods and feelings – how you choose to compose and use them is what will guide the viewer through the image.

Choosing to focus on a single color in particular is both creative and good use of light, contrast and saturation is what can make or break an image. Pick a color and make it the dominant and outstanding and leave no doubt about which color you wanted to make the main point of your shot.

I am having huge problems with my computer, so much that I need to buy a new one, so these are old shots that I have here already used in my previous posts over the years. I am not able to access my computer files, or additional hard drives to add photos or load new ones from the camera disk. I am able to access the internet for now, so I am using these here this week.

Think landscapes of rolling green hills, or food shots of red chilli peppers or the all encompassing golden color at sunset – there’s a noticeable dominant color there and that’s what we’re looking for.

orange
Green
  • Composition: Compose your shot so there’s no doubt as to which color you’re trying to use. Think about any emotions or moods your photo can evoke and bring that to the forefront. You could use a lot of negative space to direct interest to your subject or go in full-tilt and fill the frame
  • Lighting: Lighting and shadows add depth to an image and can change an image dramatically. An underlit and underexposed image brings to mind a different mood than a bright, well-lit one.
  • White Balance: . Using and adjusting white balance while taking your photos will be valuable
  • Contrast: If there are multiple colors and shades in your image, ensure that there’s one that’s visibly up front and recognizable – it contrasts and stands out from the other shades and tone of the image.
  • Post-processing: Feel free to go nuts with post-processing and editing to render some cool color effects. But remember, less is more.
Blue

52 Frames: Week 30:  Single Focal Point!

This time around, we want you to look closer at a Single Focal Point. This is not a technical challenge, it’s more compositional in nature – guide your viewer’s eye to a distinct part of your image. There are a number of ways that this can be done – depth of field can make it so a subject is in focus while almost everything else is blurred; or you could use negative space and a minimalist composition to draw in the viewer to one part of the image. Sometimes you can also use light as a frame to guide the viewer’s perspective to your subject – think spotlight and light shaping.

These photos I took from a car ferry while on my way to visit a small island of Högsåra were one of my ideas to this topic. Strong Focal Point: This is pretty much the crux of the challenge – but it matters the most: choose a strong focal point that’s easily identifiable as the main point of interest of your shot.

It’s all about tuning out the distractions and taking your viewer to the exact spot in your image you want their eyes to well… focus on. You might also want to consider getting some help from your editing software with vignettes, color pops and contrast to make your desired subject stand out. Even better, use a combination of these techniques and other skills to get this challenge sorted.

Depth Of Field: Use a shallow depth of field to isolate your subject. You might also want to consider getting some help from your editing software with vignettes, color pops and contrast to make your desired subject stand out. Even better, use a combination of these techniques and other skills to get this challenge sorted. That’s what I tried here with my strawberry shots.

Leading Lines: Think of using leading lines to guide the viewer to your intended point of interest.

Leading Lines to guide the viewer to your intended point of interest in mind I took these images of old buildings and this lush road. Consider using some sort of frames to bring in the watcher’s attention – a window, slats of a fence or some tree branches; shooting through something can also work to steer attention to your focal point.

Color Contrast: Contrasting colors help the eye to easily differentiate the subject from the background

I had this n mind when I took this image from an old mill window in Mathildedal, contrasting colors help the eye to easily differentiate the subject from the background.

52 Frames: Week 29: Common Object!

This week, we’re looking to shoot a Common Object. And isn’t that what photography is all about, really? Taking the mundane and shining a different light on it. Highlighting an object or scene that we normally pass by with no notice, and making it something special.

Think about all the common objects you can see around you right this moment – a bottle, socks, a pen, eggs, coffee mugs, perfume vapor, cell phone – the list of subjects you have this week are endless.

beads

I once again left this to the last minute, being on holiday it is all about being lazy, or not if you are married to a man who needs something done every day. So this week we have re-arranged our sauna / guest room furniture, got rid of some stuff, bought some new to replace the old one. Re arranges the kitchen cabinets, put up new shelfs. We gave a away a car load of old furniture to be recycled to a flee market. A car load of stuff to the be recycle center. Busy with ordinary, common objects, but it never crossed my mind to take photos. Today, last day to give in the submission I took some photos of common objects.

I often wear costume jewelry, so common to me. I drink coffee, wine and my hubby enjoys whisky. These are some finds from the cottage. Also these old glasses I found whilst our cleaning spree.

Now the challenge is to simply make the ordinary look extra ordinary, or at least photographed well. You could try focusing on a particular detail or texture. Or perhaps show how you use it in your day-to-day life. Tell a story about how something mundane and ordinary can be a valuable part of your day.

Sailing at sunset

what is life with a occasional glass of wine or a cup of coffee

Old coffee cups

TIPS:

  • Selection: Start at the very beginning – pick an object that speaks to you – whether it’s your car keys that you pick up everyday, or the chef’s knife you use to prep dinner.
  • Composition: Arrange things how you want them – the great thing about common objects is that you can arrange them as you see fit; you’re not restricted by an inability to pick things up and move them around.
  • Tones & Colors: The overall look and feel of the colors in an image evoke different senses and emotions – do pay attention to the composition of colors and overall tones in your image, in terms of being complementary or adding contrast.
  • Balance: This is all about the visual weight- obviously, larger objects that fill the frame are meant to hold the viewer’s attention the most. Certain items can add nuance and help balance a frame without taking away from the main subject.

52 Frames: Week 28: Silhouette -v2

Photography is drawing with light and this week’s Silhouette challenge firmly shows us that. A silhouette is about bringing together contrasts of a well-lit background against a dark subject, making the subject’s shape and outline as the main point of focus. A silhouette balances what the viewer sees alongside the darker toned facets of the subject that are intentionally kept hidden from the light.

Silhouettes are a great way to tell a story while leaving it up to the imagination of the viewer – there aren’t visible features to express emotion, so your viewer will fill in details depending on the context of the image – use this to direct your viewer’s line of thinking.

Waiting for the rain to stop

This is a lesson in exposure, composition and creativity all coming together. While silhouettes are outline.. Portraits, Still Life, Architecture and Nature typically make for good silhouette genres.

Silhouettes can often convey some kind of mystic story. By leaving the details in the dark, the story becomes compelling and the viewer is more engaged with the picture.

A boy and a fox

I was nearly ready to cheat, until my youngest grandson said he would let me take a photo of him. It was a rainy day and he sat by the window with a cuddly fox. Here was my opportunity to capture a silhouette

Alone

Summer days

The summer weather can be unpredictable, we are now under low pressure and have had sunshine and rain showers. We have spent this week at the country side. So my photos are this time naturally from here.

Field new our summer house
Clouds over the fields
View from the sauna patio
104 year old log sauna

52 Frames: Week 28: Silhouette!!

Photography is drawing with light and this week’s Silhouette challenge firmly shows us that. A silhouette is about bringing together contrasts of a well-lit background against a dark subject, making the subject’s shape and outline as the main point of focus. A silhouette balances what the viewer sees alongside the darker toned facets of the subject that are intentionally kept hidden from the light.

People waiting for sunset in Crete

Silhouettes are a great way to tell a story while leaving it up to the imagination of the viewer – there aren’t visible features to express emotion, so your viewer will fill in details depending on the context of the image – use this to direct your viewer’s line of thinking.

waiting for the sunset

This is a lesson in exposure, composition and creativity all coming together. While silhouettes are commonly shot in the day and at golden / blue hours, you can absolutely shoot silhouettes at night too. This will work best when the object being shot is recognizable through their well-defined shape and outline.. Portraits, Still Life, Architecture and Nature typically make for good silhouette genres.

Silhouettes can often convey some kind of mystic story. By leaving the details in the dark, the story becomes compelling and the viewer is more engaged with the picture.

Sailing at sunset

I would have loved to use these shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of silhouette! But I will have to come up with something new for the challenge or I could cheat… no, I won’t do that.

Waiting
Palm trees at sunset

TIPS:

  • Background Choice: Very often, we blur out the background and pay less attention to it. Here, pay a little extra attention to your choice of background. Make it contrast with the shape of your main subject.
  • Narrow Aperture: Shoot with a relatively narrow aperture of f/8 or higher to reduce the amount of light falling on your sensor, getting great Depth Of Field and also reducing chromatic aberrations especially if you’re shooting into the light.
  • Metering: We want to “trick” our camera into intentionally under-exposing the subject. So use spot metering or expose for the background.
  • Post-processing: Use software wisely – in post processing, it’s generally helpful to boost the contrast in your image, add more saturation, and increase the blacks slightly to improve a silhouette shot.

52 Frames: Week 27: Negative Space!!

 Less is more. This week’s Negative Space challenge is what those words are all about. Make your composition’s subject stand out by ensuring you eliminate clutter, distractions and sometimes even a background.

Peony in monochrome

Many minimalistic photography images have a great deal of negative space to isolate the subject. There are tons of genres and ideas that would make for very compelling shots – architecture, landscapes, portraits, food photography, abstracts and so much more. Think about the story or emotion you’d like to convey to your viewer and compose your shot after taking some time to think about it.

Daisy

We’re looking for clear, un-cluttered images where the space surrounding the main subject or idea enhances your shot by taking the viewer’s eye straight there. That little bit of extra space allows for breathing room and leaves no doubt as to what the main point of interest is.

Alone with bokeh

There’s magic in negative space, when used wisely, so think, breathe, shoot…

TIPS:

  • Zoom with your feet: Move around to get the best composition for your photo.
  • Different shooting angles: Because everything else is simplified in your frame, you have more license to “break” the rules of typical composition, for example where your subject is placed in the frame, or where they are looking.
  • Find your background first: Go on a hunt for a red brick wall, or a blue garage door, then place your subject in front of it.
  • Balance: Use the negative space to balance out the main subject. Don’t go overboard with the negative space, making it hard for the viewer to understand and absorb the main focus point of your shot.
  • Shoot wide open: That dreamy, creamy bokeh is a great way to simplify your subject’s background, and keep the frame more minimalistic.
Negative space with daisies

I would have loved to use some of the shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of negative space.

52 Frames: Week 26: Pattern!

For many of us, seeing a Pattern comes quite naturally – after all, it’s just something being repeated in a pleasing way. That’s why so many of our creations use patterns – whether it’s the crimped crust of a pie or some beautiful inlay mosaic work on floor tiles – patterns and repetition of shapes stands out to us.

I had lots of ideas, but well I run out of time and took an easy way out, because patterns are everywhere, but to get an interesting shot of it, is an other thing altogether. I went with the fern this time as the shot of peaches and butterfly are not new and the challenge is to take a new photo every week. If I had had the energy I could have tried to capture similar shots again. Not this time 🙂

Maple leaves

Let the patterns to tell a story and that’s where the creativity comes in. Look for geometric and sharp angular patterns if you want to compose something using a pattern of shapes. You could also seek out patterns with colors. This challenge can overlap with other sub-genres like Repetition or Textures. Other genres like Abstract Photography or Architecture are also great ideas to find patterns.

Fern leaves

One final thought – Most, if not all, patterns have repetition. But not all repetition forms a pattern. Just think about that for a bit.

Extra Challenge: Found In Nature

The wings of a butterfly

Tips and Tutorials

TIPS:

  • Shooting Angle: Consider taking your shot at an unconventional angle – the human brain perceives patterns differently when shown in different perspectives.
  • Shape Patterns: Hunt for shapes and geometrical forms that draw the eye in. Use those to direct the viewer to where you want.
  • Color Patterns: In a world of color, look for collections and bunches of distinct colors that are recognizable.
  • Go Wide: A wider field of view may help get more subtle patterns to be more noticeable.
  • Make Your Own: Using a prism or reflective surfaces can make for some amazing portraits.
  • Break The Pattern: Try and create a contrasting point of interest by breaking the pattern and having an object of focus in the midst of your composition.

Peach

52 Frames: Week 25:  What is it!

What the heck is that?

That is what, I have tried to figure out, how to shoot it. That is between my coughing fits, this flu or what ever it is very strong and persistent.

If that’s the reaction your photo gets, then that means you did it right! Did i succeed in anyways?

Guess?

This week we are diving into the abstract, the macro, the hidden angle, the way the light touches an object, or even getting inside an object, and giving a different view of a familiar world in order to challenge our viewer into figuring just WHAT IT IS that we photographed!

can you guess?

You do not need to shoot macro or up close, you can mask certain details using light (or shadow) to show what you want and hide what you don’t!

Is it a whisk? A spoon? A grain of sand?

What the heck is that?

what is that

Midsummer

it is that time of the year again, the amount of light we get, the longest day passed, but we are now celebrating midsummer here in Finland, lot’s of people are driving to countryside to enjoy the this festive season, to be bitten by mosquitos, but some may choose to stay in the cities. Well we came to our summer house to enjoy the light nights and warm summer days that the forecast has promised us for this weekend.

moonlit midsummer night

I am still coughing my brains out, tired from lack of sleep as soon as I try to lay my head on the pillow, well in my case at the moment pillows you can say bye bye to sleep. So I haven’t had any energy to post anything. But for midsummer I have to do something to celebrate, I took these at out last visit, it was full moon time, I never got around to posting them, so here is some beauty from one of my favorite places. Beautiful Finnish countryside in the summer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

52 Frames: Week 24:  Shoot From Above!

Time to look at things from a new perspective – this week, we’re going to Shoot From Above. Most images are taken at eye level or with the camera parallel to the horizon. With a high angle shot, we’re trying to get photos from an unusual angle, taken from above the subject and looking down towards what you’re shooting. Why ? Well, the short and sweet answer is – you get some cool shots this way.

I submitted the one of the table, but I wanted to post some of the droplets I captured this morning, yes, I shot them from above, but you cannot tell that from the photos. So I did not use them. I am going to do an other post just with them, but here are some of my choices of including some flowers also, naturally 🙂 My entry was not the most unusual, or original, but due to not being able to venture outside my yard due to summer flu my choices are rather limited.

Droplets
old newspaper clippings on a table top

You can shoot some cool portraiture by getting up higher than your subject. Food and product shots are also well-suited to being shot from above (just pay attention to your lighting and shadows). Oh, and let’s not forget flat-lays – you can go minimalistic or mega creative with your ideas here.

And of course, the evergreen favorite: landscape shots – whether natural or urban. Just position yourself somewhere high (and safe) and shoot scenes of what’s happening below -. Go a bit abstract and look down the mirrored facade of an office building.

Droplets on a string of grass
Fern
  • Depth Of Field: Your DoF will help a lot here – do yo want to isolate your subject?; Go for a wider aperture like f/1.8 +. Want lots of detail in focus for that cityscape? Maybe f/8 or f/16 would be more suitable.
  • Composition: Look for lines and objects around that help create a strong composition, especially if your subject is isolated and at a distance.
  • Go High: If you can’t get to a height, try and make your camera do so – hold it up higher above your head and if you’re lucky to have a flip-out screen, that’s exactly the scenario that it’s there for! You could also mount your camera on a monopod, set a timer and hoist it up high to get a cool shot.
  • Selfie Stick: It was all the rage a few years ago, and the humble selfie stick can easily help out in this challenge.

52 Frames: Week 23: Triangular!

Three’s company or a crowd… 🤷🏻‍♀️  – but in photography, we can use 3 “lines” to make a Triangular Composition – three lines in an image to create either an “actual” triangle shape, like a harsh shadow on the street, or hands raised above ones head, or a “perceived” triangle shape like posing a group of people in your frame, or cutting your frame in half with some diagonal shape (your subject’s limbs placed diagonally in your frame can make great perceived triangles in your frame’s composition). Other ways perceived triangles can be utilized in your composition could include the way a lamp casts light onto your subject, or a leading line taking you into the frame.

Mountain goat

This challenge is NOT a request to find a triangle toy, or a triangular OBJECT and take a photo of it. This is a compositional challenge, as its name implies: Triangular COMPOSITION. Just like for the Rule of Thirds challenge, for example, wasn’t a request to go out and find tic-tac-toe boards!

Gorge

Triangular composition is one of those “guidelines” in photography composition, that can enhance interest in your frame, if or when you can incorporate it. The purpose of this challenge is to first train yourself to SEE it. Once you understand where triangles take form in composition, you can then craft your own frame utilizing one of these techniques.

Tree on the hillside in Crete

you can achieve triangular composition in many ways: by placing your subject’s hand on their ear, by catching the harsh mid-day shadow on a street, by capturing a long, straight road, that disappears in the distance.

Triangular Composition

This challenge is not (necessarily) referring to the “golden triangle”, the focus is more on these scenarios where you can identify regular ol’ triangles in your composition.

Be creative : let’s not be obtuse  in looking for the right 📐angle. We’re all equilaterally🔺capable of acutely 🚩 good photos.

Abstract – icy

“Abstract art is uniquely modern. It is a fundamentally romantic response to modern life – rebellious, individualistic, unconventional, sensitive, irritable.” – Robert Motherwell

“You can`t look at abstract art without thinking.” – Patricia Cole

“The longer you look at an object, the more abstract it becomes, and, ironically, the more real.” – Lucian Freud

52 Frames: Week 21: Inspired By A Photographer! #2

Andy Gotts MBE MA he is a photographer based in London, England, and New York, USA. He is most noted for his black and white portraits of Hollywood actors and singers, but he has occasional color shots, but even they are in muted colors.

I did not have a anyone famous to take photograph of, but my trusted model stepped up for the challenge.

What?

Whether it’s legendary photographers whose work you’ve come across in a gallery exhibition or cool, modern photogs on Insta (and 52Frames.com), there are so many photographers whose work inspires me. Sometimes it’s just the concept, story and creativity of the composition; at other times, I find the technical aspects to be just jaw-dropping.

Being inspired isn’t the same as a 1:1 copy – far from it, it’s about learning and picking up certain aspects and nuances from a fellow photographer. Look at the tones and color palette that’s used or perhaps the technique that made it a shot for you to recall.

Still not sure whose work you’d like to pay tribute to or can’t choose from your photo heroes? Use our friendly random prompter to help you out with some well-admired photographers and the genres they’re best known for.

Eye

Holiday

I am currently on my vacation here are few shots from my trip, but I will come back to this topic when I get back home. Oh by the way I am in Crete 😊

Ravine

Abstract – pink tones

“Abstract pictures are fictive models, because they make visible a reality that we can neither see nor describe, but whose existence we can postulate.” – Gerhard Richter

“Even abstract shapes must have a likeness.” – Willem de Kooning

52 Frames: Week 22: Everything In Focus!

We’ve all seen wonderful images where a particular subject is in focus and the rest of the image is soft, so our eyes are drawn to the main element. This week, we want to see Everything In Focus. This is where your choices of subject, composition, lens selection and depth of field all come together to give us sharp images front to back.

Took this in Crete, it is from the entry to the Samariá Gorge. The gorge is situated in the National park of Samaria, in the White Mountains in West Crete. This majestuous gorge is considered one of the great attractions of Crete. It was created by a small river running between the White Mountains (Lefká Óri) and Mt. Volakias.
I took some with f/22, but as I did not have a tripod, the are a bit shaky. I think this is a sweet spot for these shot f/14

Samariá Gorge
  • Stability: Use a tripod or some sort of support to eliminate any chance of camera shake.
  • Shutter Speed: A high enough shutter speed to freeze any motion in your shot will get rid of blurs caused by movement.
  • Depth Of Field: Focusing to infinity at the highest aperture (f/22) isn’t always the best choice. Picks an aperture that’s at the sweet spot of your lens – usually a few stops below the max.
  • Focus Point: Try focusing at different points – one third of the way in or half the way in and see which gives better results.
  • Focus Mode: Single will usually be a better choice than continuous. Also, consider using manual focus to get sharp images.
  • Live View: Use live view and zoom in to your focus point to see if it’s sharp enough and lock in your focus.

Abstract – yellow tones

“There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.” – Pablo Picasso

52 Frames: Week 21: Inspired By A Photographer!

Ever feel like you’re stuck in a rut, creatively speaking ? Maybe you’re not feeling it any more ? Well, let’s get our creative juices flowing and get Inspired By A Photographer. Mine is from the friendly random prompter the name that came was Kirsty Larmour. 

Beach Moment

Whether it’s legendary photographers whose work you’ve come across in a gallery exhibition or cool, modern photogs on Insta (and 52Frames.com), there are so many photographers whose work inspires me. Sometimes it’s just the concept, story and creativity of the composition; at other times, I find the technical aspects to be just jaw-dropping.

Being inspired isn’t the same as a 1:1 copy – far from it, it’s about learning and picking up certain aspects and nuances from a fellow photographer. Look at the tones and color palette that’s used or perhaps the technique that made it a shot for you to recall.

Still not sure whose work you’d like to pay tribute to or can’t choose from your photo heroes? Use our friendly random prompter to help you out with some well-admired photographers and the genres they’re best known for.

I took these shots of a family enjoying a early morning misty moment at the beach. I took the inspiration from Kirsty by capturing the closeness, natural moment, with out any posing. As Kirsty also uses monochrome a lot, I did also that. I use it a lot so we have lots of common. I need to pick one of these, so once again I am still don’t know which to choose.

My approach to photography is to capture real life – with a little sparkle on top fueled by my obsession with pretty light. I document the little things which might otherwise slip away

Family on the beach

My approach to photography is relaxed and yet emotion focused, and this shines through in the family stories I tell. I want to capture how you laugh and love together and all the other emotions that make up your tales. The tickles and giggles and hilarious family jokes that you share – the things that are unique to you are all to be celebrated. I love natural light, and natural settings, be it your home where you feel comfortable, the beach, or out having a burger. When I join you at a session location I have a nosey around to see how I can catch you and your family naturally and in the most perfect light.  I want to find out about you and see what makes you tick; this is how I capture your personalities and true emotions as they unfold.

I want to tell your story.

Kirsty Larmour 
alone

Photography is about light and compositions and connections – nothing inspires me more than when I get all three to work together – you’ll often see what my kids call “dancing sunbeams” in my photos as I work with the light to shine on your family and bathe you all in a glow.

Kirsty Larmour 
Early morning at the beach in Monochrome

Happy family

52 Frames: Week 20: Abstract !

It’s time to put on your creative in hats 👩‍🎨 and take some Abstract images. Photography that makes use of patterns, textures, blur and often enough indistinct shapes – all to convey emotions or to share a narrative.

I did have fun with this one, you will unwillingly be subjected to several posts from my attempt to capture abstract, I shot around 170 frames and trying to find something different or more odd was difficult as I was drawn to certain look and tried to avoid the obvious

Think about focusing on colors and shapes, rather than concentrating on getting technical details like focus and depth of field. There’s absolutely NO right and wrong – it’s all subjective and open to what you – the photographer – wants their viewer to feel.Abstract photography is all about form, color and texture coupled with uncommon viewing angles. Get low, look at the undersides of things, go in close to grab some texture, use bubbles and liquid drops to make random patterns of light and color. Experiment and feel free to mix genres and techniques to create some absolutely amazing shots.

Look at playing around with blur, movement or something that looks different from what you’re trying to portray – yeah, that’s a tough nut to crack but if your viewer can turn to you and ask – “Wow! Great shot… what is it?” – yep, you’ve hit the brief.

May 16th, Sunday

It was windy, the sky was gray with the sun coming out only for a moment every now and then. I loved the contrast between the green leaves and branches against the dark sky.

Birch tree branches

May 15th, Saturday finds

As I pointed out in my previous post, it is time to pick up my camera and take it out. I did. Here are some of the captures from the first outing, still need to get in the the groove. I will try to find new ways to capture same wonders that I have photographed every spring, because the same things delight me every time.

Maple tree bud

We found the nest of common blackbird in our woodpile. I did take few photos, but we left it all alone. Hope the squirrels dot get to it before the hatch.

Summer house season has started

Life once again has changed, I have once again time to pursue my hobbies. My fixed term ended after a yea, so I find myself unemployed, and at my age getting new position is not a given. Well now I hopefully will be able to comment and participate more in the wonderful world of blogging 🙂 as I have been rather absent on that regard lately. I do look though and read post but have been rather silent. It might change.

We started our summer house / cottage season later than ever, middle of May. Usually we are there already in April, but this spring has been so cold and we had so much snow that there was no point going there. But last weekend we did go and you could see the green take over the bleakness in your eyes. I am loving it. The light is wonderful. I took these setting sun shot at 23.30 at night. The moon on the other side of the house and the setting sun on the side.

Saturday was nice, warm and sunny, but the clouds and cold wind greeted us on Sunday, but it was time to head home anyways.

Almost midnight sunset

St. Michael’s Church

Yesterday while in last minute I was looking for a architecture find to post for 52 frames I also very quickly took photos of the church, I was planning to post shot of the library alone but ended up using a shot of both. I only had 20 minutes to take photos so I did not have awful lot of time to think about angels. Well I did capture the early spring green on the trees and as the leaves are still so small you can actually see the church too.

Kirkkonummi’s medieval stone church is located in the center of Kirkkonummi. The exact time when the church was built is not known, but the work apparently began in the 15th century. A wooden church must have previously stood on the site. Kirkkonummi’s church is named after St. Michael’s Church, after the archangel Michael.

St. Michael’s Church, after the archangel Michael.

Originally, Kyrkslätt’s church was very small. In addition to stone, brick was used as a material. In the 18th century, the church began to be expanded, and in the middle of the 19th century it was rebuilt into a cruciform church, the shape the church still has. The church’s belfry was built in 1824.

Bell tower

After the Continuation War, the Soviet Union claimed the Porkala area as a base, and Kyrkslätt’s church stood on the lease area. During the Porkala parenthesis 1944–56, the church was used i.a. as an officers’ club and warehouse. After the Soviet era, the church was in poor condition.

Headstone of Olga

Immediately after the area was returned to Finland, the church began to be repaired under the leadership of Olof Hansson. Then the interior of the church was completely renewed in the 1950s style.

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