52 Frames: Week 31: Choose Color!

Look around and we’ll see something we take for granted – color. Our wonderful world is filled with it, so this week we’re asking you to Choose A Color. Make that color the theme and inspiration behind your image. Colors evoke moods and feelings – how you choose to compose and use them is what will guide the viewer through the image.

Choosing to focus on a single color in particular is both creative and good use of light, contrast and saturation is what can make or break an image. Pick a color and make it the dominant and outstanding and leave no doubt about which color you wanted to make the main point of your shot.

I am having huge problems with my computer, so much that I need to buy a new one, so these are old shots that I have here already used in my previous posts over the years. I am not able to access my computer files, or additional hard drives to add photos or load new ones from the camera disk. I am able to access the internet for now, so I am using these here this week.

Think landscapes of rolling green hills, or food shots of red chilli peppers or the all encompassing golden color at sunset – there’s a noticeable dominant color there and that’s what we’re looking for.

orange
Green
  • Composition: Compose your shot so there’s no doubt as to which color you’re trying to use. Think about any emotions or moods your photo can evoke and bring that to the forefront. You could use a lot of negative space to direct interest to your subject or go in full-tilt and fill the frame
  • Lighting: Lighting and shadows add depth to an image and can change an image dramatically. An underlit and underexposed image brings to mind a different mood than a bright, well-lit one.
  • White Balance: . Using and adjusting white balance while taking your photos will be valuable
  • Contrast: If there are multiple colors and shades in your image, ensure that there’s one that’s visibly up front and recognizable – it contrasts and stands out from the other shades and tone of the image.
  • Post-processing: Feel free to go nuts with post-processing and editing to render some cool color effects. But remember, less is more.
Blue

52 Frames: Week 30:  Single Focal Point!

This time around, we want you to look closer at a Single Focal Point. This is not a technical challenge, it’s more compositional in nature – guide your viewer’s eye to a distinct part of your image. There are a number of ways that this can be done – depth of field can make it so a subject is in focus while almost everything else is blurred; or you could use negative space and a minimalist composition to draw in the viewer to one part of the image. Sometimes you can also use light as a frame to guide the viewer’s perspective to your subject – think spotlight and light shaping.

These photos I took from a car ferry while on my way to visit a small island of Högsåra were one of my ideas to this topic. Strong Focal Point: This is pretty much the crux of the challenge – but it matters the most: choose a strong focal point that’s easily identifiable as the main point of interest of your shot.

It’s all about tuning out the distractions and taking your viewer to the exact spot in your image you want their eyes to well… focus on. You might also want to consider getting some help from your editing software with vignettes, color pops and contrast to make your desired subject stand out. Even better, use a combination of these techniques and other skills to get this challenge sorted.

Depth Of Field: Use a shallow depth of field to isolate your subject. You might also want to consider getting some help from your editing software with vignettes, color pops and contrast to make your desired subject stand out. Even better, use a combination of these techniques and other skills to get this challenge sorted. That’s what I tried here with my strawberry shots.

Leading Lines: Think of using leading lines to guide the viewer to your intended point of interest.

Leading Lines to guide the viewer to your intended point of interest in mind I took these images of old buildings and this lush road. Consider using some sort of frames to bring in the watcher’s attention – a window, slats of a fence or some tree branches; shooting through something can also work to steer attention to your focal point.

Color Contrast: Contrasting colors help the eye to easily differentiate the subject from the background

I had this n mind when I took this image from an old mill window in Mathildedal, contrasting colors help the eye to easily differentiate the subject from the background.

52 Frames: Week 29: Common Object!

This week, we’re looking to shoot a Common Object. And isn’t that what photography is all about, really? Taking the mundane and shining a different light on it. Highlighting an object or scene that we normally pass by with no notice, and making it something special.

Think about all the common objects you can see around you right this moment – a bottle, socks, a pen, eggs, coffee mugs, perfume vapor, cell phone – the list of subjects you have this week are endless.

beads

I once again left this to the last minute, being on holiday it is all about being lazy, or not if you are married to a man who needs something done every day. So this week we have re-arranged our sauna / guest room furniture, got rid of some stuff, bought some new to replace the old one. Re arranges the kitchen cabinets, put up new shelfs. We gave a away a car load of old furniture to be recycled to a flee market. A car load of stuff to the be recycle center. Busy with ordinary, common objects, but it never crossed my mind to take photos. Today, last day to give in the submission I took some photos of common objects.

I often wear costume jewelry, so common to me. I drink coffee, wine and my hubby enjoys whisky. These are some finds from the cottage. Also these old glasses I found whilst our cleaning spree.

Now the challenge is to simply make the ordinary look extra ordinary, or at least photographed well. You could try focusing on a particular detail or texture. Or perhaps show how you use it in your day-to-day life. Tell a story about how something mundane and ordinary can be a valuable part of your day.

Sailing at sunset

what is life with a occasional glass of wine or a cup of coffee

Old coffee cups

TIPS:

  • Selection: Start at the very beginning – pick an object that speaks to you – whether it’s your car keys that you pick up everyday, or the chef’s knife you use to prep dinner.
  • Composition: Arrange things how you want them – the great thing about common objects is that you can arrange them as you see fit; you’re not restricted by an inability to pick things up and move them around.
  • Tones & Colors: The overall look and feel of the colors in an image evoke different senses and emotions – do pay attention to the composition of colors and overall tones in your image, in terms of being complementary or adding contrast.
  • Balance: This is all about the visual weight- obviously, larger objects that fill the frame are meant to hold the viewer’s attention the most. Certain items can add nuance and help balance a frame without taking away from the main subject.

52 Frames: Week 28: Silhouette -v2

Photography is drawing with light and this week’s Silhouette challenge firmly shows us that. A silhouette is about bringing together contrasts of a well-lit background against a dark subject, making the subject’s shape and outline as the main point of focus. A silhouette balances what the viewer sees alongside the darker toned facets of the subject that are intentionally kept hidden from the light.

Silhouettes are a great way to tell a story while leaving it up to the imagination of the viewer – there aren’t visible features to express emotion, so your viewer will fill in details depending on the context of the image – use this to direct your viewer’s line of thinking.

Waiting for the rain to stop

This is a lesson in exposure, composition and creativity all coming together. While silhouettes are outline.. Portraits, Still Life, Architecture and Nature typically make for good silhouette genres.

Silhouettes can often convey some kind of mystic story. By leaving the details in the dark, the story becomes compelling and the viewer is more engaged with the picture.

A boy and a fox

I was nearly ready to cheat, until my youngest grandson said he would let me take a photo of him. It was a rainy day and he sat by the window with a cuddly fox. Here was my opportunity to capture a silhouette

Alone

52 Frames: Week 28: Silhouette!!

Photography is drawing with light and this week’s Silhouette challenge firmly shows us that. A silhouette is about bringing together contrasts of a well-lit background against a dark subject, making the subject’s shape and outline as the main point of focus. A silhouette balances what the viewer sees alongside the darker toned facets of the subject that are intentionally kept hidden from the light.

People waiting for sunset in Crete

Silhouettes are a great way to tell a story while leaving it up to the imagination of the viewer – there aren’t visible features to express emotion, so your viewer will fill in details depending on the context of the image – use this to direct your viewer’s line of thinking.

waiting for the sunset

This is a lesson in exposure, composition and creativity all coming together. While silhouettes are commonly shot in the day and at golden / blue hours, you can absolutely shoot silhouettes at night too. This will work best when the object being shot is recognizable through their well-defined shape and outline.. Portraits, Still Life, Architecture and Nature typically make for good silhouette genres.

Silhouettes can often convey some kind of mystic story. By leaving the details in the dark, the story becomes compelling and the viewer is more engaged with the picture.

Sailing at sunset

I would have loved to use these shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of silhouette! But I will have to come up with something new for the challenge or I could cheat… no, I won’t do that.

Waiting
Palm trees at sunset

TIPS:

  • Background Choice: Very often, we blur out the background and pay less attention to it. Here, pay a little extra attention to your choice of background. Make it contrast with the shape of your main subject.
  • Narrow Aperture: Shoot with a relatively narrow aperture of f/8 or higher to reduce the amount of light falling on your sensor, getting great Depth Of Field and also reducing chromatic aberrations especially if you’re shooting into the light.
  • Metering: We want to “trick” our camera into intentionally under-exposing the subject. So use spot metering or expose for the background.
  • Post-processing: Use software wisely – in post processing, it’s generally helpful to boost the contrast in your image, add more saturation, and increase the blacks slightly to improve a silhouette shot.

52 Frames: Week 27: Negative Space!!

 Less is more. This week’s Negative Space challenge is what those words are all about. Make your composition’s subject stand out by ensuring you eliminate clutter, distractions and sometimes even a background.

Peony in monochrome

Many minimalistic photography images have a great deal of negative space to isolate the subject. There are tons of genres and ideas that would make for very compelling shots – architecture, landscapes, portraits, food photography, abstracts and so much more. Think about the story or emotion you’d like to convey to your viewer and compose your shot after taking some time to think about it.

Daisy

We’re looking for clear, un-cluttered images where the space surrounding the main subject or idea enhances your shot by taking the viewer’s eye straight there. That little bit of extra space allows for breathing room and leaves no doubt as to what the main point of interest is.

Alone with bokeh

There’s magic in negative space, when used wisely, so think, breathe, shoot…

TIPS:

  • Zoom with your feet: Move around to get the best composition for your photo.
  • Different shooting angles: Because everything else is simplified in your frame, you have more license to “break” the rules of typical composition, for example where your subject is placed in the frame, or where they are looking.
  • Find your background first: Go on a hunt for a red brick wall, or a blue garage door, then place your subject in front of it.
  • Balance: Use the negative space to balance out the main subject. Don’t go overboard with the negative space, making it hard for the viewer to understand and absorb the main focus point of your shot.
  • Shoot wide open: That dreamy, creamy bokeh is a great way to simplify your subject’s background, and keep the frame more minimalistic.
Negative space with daisies

I would have loved to use some of the shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of negative space.

52 Frames, Week 4: Minimalist!

Minimalist!

Still working with what I could find at home. Minimalist as a topic was great as I am still on sick leave due to Covid. I have been home since January 3rd. I can tell you the walls are beginning to fall on me. Still so tired, I have about 4 hours of OK feeling then I am back on the sofa watching tv.

I have to pick one of these to share, do you have any opinions to help me with which one I should choose to be my minimalist pick. All opinions are welcome.

1.


which color is better ? 5. and 6.
10

52 Frames, Week 3: Complementary Colors!

Complementary Colors! Extra Challenge: Very Peri

Still working with what I could find at home. Luckily I have a large collection of different colored scarves so I could find a suitable background color for the challenge. The yellow fake flower acted as a contrast.

Very Peri and yellow – Complementary Colors!

Challenge received and done. I had another picture too, but after consideration, I ended up with this clearer and more minimalist version with the extra challenge

Complementary Colors! Blue and Orange


52 Frames week 2; hello from my backyard

We had beautiful days here the past week and I was not able to go out and capture the beauty, too sick and too tired. I have been in the house from January 3rd, first in quarantine for 3 days, then sick. The instructions what and when to do change constantly, it is confusing, but you figure it out on the way.

Well I did go outside to my backyard to capture so of the winter beauty, I am so happy that we have private and pretty view to rest our eyes on. That pine tree looks so lovely on the hill covered with snow.

52 Frames Week 1 – Selfie: Sick and tired

I got it, my hubby got it and my son too. I did this for a challenge but it is appropriate for saying, I will not be all that active in next few days