Beautiful in Black and White 7

The circus in black and white photos has it’s own kind of mood.

Horses at the circus
Globe of Death
Aerial Hoop
Outside the kids looked at this Martine van from Holland

52 Frames: Week 28: Silhouette -v2

Photography is drawing with light and this week’s Silhouette challenge firmly shows us that. A silhouette is about bringing together contrasts of a well-lit background against a dark subject, making the subject’s shape and outline as the main point of focus. A silhouette balances what the viewer sees alongside the darker toned facets of the subject that are intentionally kept hidden from the light.

Silhouettes are a great way to tell a story while leaving it up to the imagination of the viewer – there aren’t visible features to express emotion, so your viewer will fill in details depending on the context of the image – use this to direct your viewer’s line of thinking.

Waiting for the rain to stop

This is a lesson in exposure, composition and creativity all coming together. While silhouettes are outline.. Portraits, Still Life, Architecture and Nature typically make for good silhouette genres.

Silhouettes can often convey some kind of mystic story. By leaving the details in the dark, the story becomes compelling and the viewer is more engaged with the picture.

A boy and a fox

I was nearly ready to cheat, until my youngest grandson said he would let me take a photo of him. It was a rainy day and he sat by the window with a cuddly fox. Here was my opportunity to capture a silhouette

Alone

52 Frames: Week 28: Silhouette!!

Photography is drawing with light and this week’s Silhouette challenge firmly shows us that. A silhouette is about bringing together contrasts of a well-lit background against a dark subject, making the subject’s shape and outline as the main point of focus. A silhouette balances what the viewer sees alongside the darker toned facets of the subject that are intentionally kept hidden from the light.

People waiting for sunset in Crete

Silhouettes are a great way to tell a story while leaving it up to the imagination of the viewer – there aren’t visible features to express emotion, so your viewer will fill in details depending on the context of the image – use this to direct your viewer’s line of thinking.

waiting for the sunset

This is a lesson in exposure, composition and creativity all coming together. While silhouettes are commonly shot in the day and at golden / blue hours, you can absolutely shoot silhouettes at night too. This will work best when the object being shot is recognizable through their well-defined shape and outline.. Portraits, Still Life, Architecture and Nature typically make for good silhouette genres.

Silhouettes can often convey some kind of mystic story. By leaving the details in the dark, the story becomes compelling and the viewer is more engaged with the picture.

Sailing at sunset

I would have loved to use these shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of silhouette! But I will have to come up with something new for the challenge or I could cheat… no, I won’t do that.

Waiting
Palm trees at sunset

TIPS:

  • Background Choice: Very often, we blur out the background and pay less attention to it. Here, pay a little extra attention to your choice of background. Make it contrast with the shape of your main subject.
  • Narrow Aperture: Shoot with a relatively narrow aperture of f/8 or higher to reduce the amount of light falling on your sensor, getting great Depth Of Field and also reducing chromatic aberrations especially if you’re shooting into the light.
  • Metering: We want to “trick” our camera into intentionally under-exposing the subject. So use spot metering or expose for the background.
  • Post-processing: Use software wisely – in post processing, it’s generally helpful to boost the contrast in your image, add more saturation, and increase the blacks slightly to improve a silhouette shot.

52 Frames: Week 27: Negative Space!!

 Less is more. This week’s Negative Space challenge is what those words are all about. Make your composition’s subject stand out by ensuring you eliminate clutter, distractions and sometimes even a background.

Peony in monochrome

Many minimalistic photography images have a great deal of negative space to isolate the subject. There are tons of genres and ideas that would make for very compelling shots – architecture, landscapes, portraits, food photography, abstracts and so much more. Think about the story or emotion you’d like to convey to your viewer and compose your shot after taking some time to think about it.

Daisy

We’re looking for clear, un-cluttered images where the space surrounding the main subject or idea enhances your shot by taking the viewer’s eye straight there. That little bit of extra space allows for breathing room and leaves no doubt as to what the main point of interest is.

Alone with bokeh

There’s magic in negative space, when used wisely, so think, breathe, shoot…

TIPS:

  • Zoom with your feet: Move around to get the best composition for your photo.
  • Different shooting angles: Because everything else is simplified in your frame, you have more license to “break” the rules of typical composition, for example where your subject is placed in the frame, or where they are looking.
  • Find your background first: Go on a hunt for a red brick wall, or a blue garage door, then place your subject in front of it.
  • Balance: Use the negative space to balance out the main subject. Don’t go overboard with the negative space, making it hard for the viewer to understand and absorb the main focus point of your shot.
  • Shoot wide open: That dreamy, creamy bokeh is a great way to simplify your subject’s background, and keep the frame more minimalistic.
Negative space with daisies

I would have loved to use some of the shots I took at Crete as they would have suited this challenge perfectly, but no, still I think they are great examples of negative space.

52 Frames, Week 13: Emotion

This week, in search for emotion and someone to photograph, I think I have over used my model, so I gave him a week off 🙂 I am full of emotions, I took some selfies as I had no one to else available had a busy week at work and did not getting anything done. No grandkids live near any more, because their expressive faces would have been so easy to capture true emotion.

On to a “creative-led” challenge this week! Really the core of what photography is about, the core of EVERY story – Emotion. Strong photos should tell a clear story and evoke feelings in those who see our shots.

sad, tired …

What could emotion look like? Perhaps the happiness reflected in the eyes of a child, the look of love shared between a couple, the joy of a team celebrating their latest win on the football field or even the pride of a baker showcasing their latest creation. Human emotions run deep and are varied – we can be pensive, or be battling our inner demons – introspective portraits can tell compelling stories.

Slightly optimistic, I will come up with something…

Or just happy ….

52 Frames, Week 11: An Activity!

I have been recovering from an oculoplastic surgery, I look like an owl. I have since Thursday been doing cold treatment, eye drops and antiseptic cream in eyes several times a day. So trying to get a shot of any sort of activity has been a challenge.

But we did go out for lunch yesterday so I took some shot then. I actually sat in the restaurant with my sunglasses on the entire time, felt a bit silly, but no way could ruin other peoples appetite by showing my eyes.

This week, in search for An Activity 

At any given point of time, we’re all doing something, so let’s capture that this week and shoot An Activity. This week’s challenge is deliberately open-ended and is there for you to make the most of your creative juices. Basically, think of a verb, something ending in -ing.

we do need to eat …

Capture a moment in time that depicts someone doing something. Set the tone of the image to add more depth and emotion to your shot. Think about why you want to capture this particular scene and how you can best convey that to your viewer. How ? Make good choices with your lens, composition, lighting and of course, how you edit your image in the end.

we could go walking
me watching hubby dropping snow from the patio roof..

Color or black and white.

52 Frames, Week 10: Low Key!

This week, we’re going low, or at least shooting Low Key. 

A low key image is going to have shadows, dark tones and, in a lot of cases, the subject of the photo is the only thing shown off with your lighting.

And speaking of light, there is usually only one source of lighting, but be careful because you could shoot with one light source and still not be hitting a true low key photo.

Low Key
Monochrome profile in Low key

A low key shot draws the viewer’s eye to your subject with no distractions. Think dramaintensity, and moodiness.

If you’re thinking low key is only for studio work, think again! You’ll see in our examples great low key photos of wildlife, architecture, even landscapes.

Low key photography doesn’t mean it has to be a black and white photo. It’s the overall dark you find in the tones, not the absence of color, though that works, too. 

High contrast

Contrast is what makes photography interesting.

— Conrad Hall

Original colors, do notice the red car 🙂

By merely increasing or decreasing the amount of contrast in any area we can move the observer through the painting or photograph.

Black and while high contrast image.

52 Frames, Week 9: Reflections!

I did have an idea at to begin with to this challenge, yesterday I was given too many options. If you have read or seen any of my posts you will know, well, I have a dilemma . Drove to Helsinki to check out the beautiful city library, the whole square where it is located is full of reflection opportunities.

Light. That’s the medium photographers create their art with. We usually play with light and shadows but this week we’re going to try something often overlooked – Reflections. Boost your photo’s aesthetic by using reflections – add more depth and complexity with this aspect of photography and see the world in a whole new way.

The first shot is not from there but from my office window as I thought it came out rather nicely.

Office view from my office to a traffic circle in Kirkkonummi.

Be creative and think of using symmetry with mirrors or tangentially, go beyond the literal. Visualize your composition, be patient and don’t hesitate to try new stuff out to get a great shot.

Take time to observe your surroundings for cool opportunities out there or feel free to make your own indoors. Just ask yourself: “What is the light doing here ?”

Support for the current situation in the world can seen in reflection
Music hall and Helsinki sign reflected from the opposite building
Reflections on entrance to the Oodi library

Oodi is a striking building with its glass and steel structures and wooden façade, its design a combination of traditional and contemporary flavours. The energy-efficient library is an impressive calling card for Finnish architecture.

Below are reflections on the Music Hall in Helsinki

Red car and Oodi

52 Frames, Week 8: Rule Of Thirds !

I had no idea to begin with to this challenge, but as we yesterday went to a museum tours, it kind a came to me. The new locations and the lights there and few moments captured my attention. I have 20 hours to choose what I am going to submit. Want to help me?

The first one I liked that the girl in the phot and the subject where both looking down. same but with to different compositions. These are from Pictorialism – the Dawn of Photographic Art

The Rule Of Thirds  – one of the earliest photo composition techniques that an aspiring photographer comes across in their photo journey.

It’s simple, versatile, and effective in many situations.

It’s a classic for a reason – it works well and improves photographic composition immensely.

Simply put, place two vertical lines to divide the image into 3 equal columns and two horizontal lines so you also have 3 equally-sized horizontal rows so the entire scene is divided into 9 segments. (Think, tic-tac-toe grid.) Place points of interest in the scene where the lines meet to improve the overall look and feel of the image.

These are from the Theatre Museum.

Something I noticed #11

Reflection. I always look for those. I am also reflecting, pondering about the past and future.

I visited some art and photography exhibitions this summer, as well as looking at art, I looked at the people looking at it and , yes, reflections.

Capture a moment

I was sitting down at the dock when I took these photos of this boy walking towards me. I liked the look that I captured and I tried to enhance the cinematic feel that I got from the image. Looks a bit like an Old italian film when in Monochrome. No? Yes?

Happy people

We are having a lovely sunny winter day, flags flying in the honour of Minna Canth Day (March 19th.)

Minna Canth (1844-1897) was a writer and social influencer who sought to improve the position of women and the disadvantaged through her works and work. Canth has been flagged in honor of her birthday and equality since 2003. Minna Canth became the eighth person which has got its own flag-raising day and a first woman. She was preceded by seven men.

But no more about equality, how about this news, despite the devastating events of the last 12 months and the resulting decline in mental health in a number of destinations, there’s been no change at the top spot when it comes to ranking the happiest country in the world.
For the fourth year running, Finland has come out on top in the annual list powered by data from the Gallup World Poll, with Iceland, Denmark, Switzerland, and the Netherlands following in second, third, fourth and fifth position respectively.

To celebrate that I am going to show some solemn faces from the happiest country. My grandkids, the two older ones are not so keen to smile at the camera even if they are happy kids most of the times 🙂 I caught these shots while they were watching a movie and reading comics. The youngest is full of smiles 🙂 when eating popcorn.

Faces from the past

As in previous post about faces – well people. I started today to look at some old photographs, the first set is my mum and her twin sister. Next my parents and the last two are of my aunt and uncle( my mother’s other sister and her husband) Well this a memories of people passed.

My parents wedding photo

Faces *

Frank, from Beach walk reflections approached me if I wanted to collaborate with him and provide photos for one of his posts. He asked what kind photos I have, he had a list of topics to choose from. I could have provided photos to many of the topics, in the end and he chose to write about Faces* and after few discussions later he suggested photo collages, which worked out well for me.

Have a look at his post to see what he wrote about faces and the collages he chose to go with it. This was fun, maybe will do this again 🙂 You can visit his blog also from here* and see the rest of the images.

How to survive November 2020-17

Art By Ritva

Today was a lazy day, I started this and did not finish. I ended up trying to come up with a Xmas Card Idea, yes, I still send actual cards. I also edited one photo of my grandson for today. I love the mood and the light in this photo even if I say so myself. I also did some digital art, this was one of them, you can see it below.

If you wish to participate in this survival of the darkest month challenge, use this link to add your post to it. PARALLEL LINES

Art By Ritva

Calm of the morning

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To me the sea is a continual miracle; The fishes that swim, the rocks, the motion of the waves, the ships with men in them. What stranger miracles are there?  

~Walt Whitman

The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace.     

~Kate Chopin

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Six years old

The dreaded photographer’s block. I,ve had it. I have it now, sort of, As one is mostly at home.

You sit on your couch, you look at your beautiful gear, and you just don’t feel it. You can’t think of anything worth shooting. Nothing takes you.

It’s frustrating as hell. An empty feeling.

At this i take a look at archives and edit old photos that I have discarded previously, with my new found editing skills I am able to breathe new life to them. Maybe this will get me going.

Mostly I have taken photos of my grandchildren, when they let me.

New Edits #12

Still in Australia, the beautiful coast of Victoria certainly stole my heart.

B&W Edits #2

I have always for some reason liked these photos, I think that i have captures a feeling, emotion in these shots. I also have a liking for BW photos so I resided to edit them as such. There is a slight change of tone in these as the first edit s slightly warmer, maybe more afternoon feel to it?

New Edits #8

Not much editing was needed here, it was a really warm sunset in yellows and oranges. Sea, Sailboat, sunset, that is a picture made of. Warm regards to all 🙂

Sunset in Negombo beach

CB&W – Signs

Signs are every where, mostly I do not take too much notice of them. These go in the theme what I’ve been posting on the blog lately. My trip to Las Vegas and California. I had to add one from the sign capital, Hong Kong. I have never seen so many signs on a street before.

Firefighters

I saw these firefighters practice in full gear, running up stairs, climbing ladders, ans carrying the victim those stairs. It looked exhausting in the +35 Celsius heat. And the situation in real situation…

I had it easier I took a photos. I edited them all slightly differently, any thoughts?

I have been following the fires in Australia as two of my cousins have been effected by them very closely. So these are relevant in that sense that you have to be prepared at all time.Keep up the skills and fitness.

The not so glamorous side

it has been years since my prior visit, but I have to say that the sadness and poverty in so much more prominent today on the streets of Las Vegas. Also the ways various people are trying to make a living. I am posting these just to remind me and us that there is always the other side to glamour. I am not so used to seeing it. so it made me very sad.